Using Multiple First Person P.O.V’s

Books that have more than one first person P.O.V (point of view) are a bit uncommon, especially when it comes to Young Adult fiction genres. The reasoning for this is because a lot of authors find it difficult to write for more than one leading character using a first person narrator. If you have ever thought of writing a book that uses more than one first person P.O.V here are some tips that might help you to get started.

            BONUS: writing exercise at the bottom.

  1. Don’t use too many characters to tell the story:  Too many characters are too hard to follow, not only for the reader but for the writer. Sometimes it can make the story more complicated than it needs to be. The highest amount of characters when writing in first person P.O.V should be four. Going over four characters can make the reader either lose interest or make the story challenging to understand.
  2. Make sure each character has purpose: To do this try asking yourself questions like: what makes this character important? Are they helping the flow of the story?
  3. Don’t change characters within a chapter: This is something that really bothered me when I was younger…actually it still bugs me today. Changing characters within a chapter is extremely irritating for readers. This is because they aren’t able to automatically indicate which character is speaking. This causes a lot of confusion for the reader, and sometimes will cause them to lose interest in the story itself.
  4. Each character should have a distinct voice: To help tell characters apart in each chapter, give them their own specific characteristics, especially in their speech. Make sure that they appear different to the reader.

 

Writing Exercise: Everyone reacts differently, even in the same situation. For this exercise we will be using two characters: a young girl (friend or sister), and a middle aged man (father or teacher). The story should be at least two pages long (typed 2 pages, written one page front and back). Here is the situation: A seven year old boy, named Julian, is hospitalized after being hit by a car on his way home from school.

After you are done writing the reaction for both characters look and see that your stories have the following:

  1. The two character have a distinctly different voice.
  2. The characters reactions are different.
  3. The characters personality suits their age.
  4. The language used in the text fit the age of the character.
  5. The story is an appropriate length.
  6. There is an atmosphere and tone.

If you would like to share your pieces (one or both), feel free to leave a link in the comment section below. Also, don’t be afraid to share your own tips on writing for multiple first person P.O.V’s.

I hope that this blog was helpful, and got you doing a little bit of writing. Before I conclude, I’ve got a question for you. Which point of you do you prefer to write in: First person, second person, or third person? Why?

 

Till next time,

 

Orion.

 

 

 

 

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One thought on “Using Multiple First Person P.O.V’s

  1. Pingback: Whats your P.O.V. ?m | cinmanblog

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