“Outside of a d…

“Outside of a dog, a book is a man’s best friend. Inside of a dog, it’s too dark to read.”

— Groucho Marx

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Tiny Angel

Today, I got the news that my cousins daughter passed away…this was his first child. I didn’t even get to find out her name, because a few days ago I just found out that she was born. The little girl was born premature at the beginning of August. This will be the second death in our family since Summer Vacation started. I didn’t know how to react to the news, so I just sat there silently, but later when I returned to my room, I started to write. I felt the need to share this with someone. Well…I wrote this for the baby:

Tiny Angel

Tiny angel wrapped in a blanket.

No more will her eyes shine.

Tiny baby covered in white roses,

To be laid into the ground.

And we’ll all cry around this sweet angel,

As they lay her down.

I’m sure that she’s smiling down from heaven.

Waiting for us to come.

Though she wishes you could be there with her,

She still has company.

Tiny angel being cradled by Jesus.

As they lay her down.

He says, “You were their first tiny angel,

And they’ll always love you.”

Tiny angel wrapped in a blanket.

No more will her eyes shine…

 

I’m so sorry…

 

Orion.

Words

One thing that writers know much more than the rest of the world, is that words have power. Words allow us to communicate, and to create. Everything that is and will be, is at some point spoken, thought of, or written. Because of this, it is important that we use and choose the right words. The good words.

            Because I volunteer with young children, I have witnessed them being taught the power of words, and the differences words can make when spoken to others as well as themselves. For example, there are good words, and bad words. Good words, are words of encouragement, of life, of love and of friendship: words that make people smile, or give them that warm-fuzzy feeling when they are read or spoken. However bad words, are words of hatred, destruction, and of pain: words that are meant to hurt others, to break them, and occasionally make them feel that awful numbness within that sometimes doesn’t fully go away. Now my question is, why is it that we are taught the differences between good and bad words, but yet as we grow we decide to use them without any thought? Why is it that when two people get into an argument, they use words that purposely meant to hurt? We know better, and yet many of us do this. We even use bad words on ourselves, telling ourselves things like we “aren’t good enough,” or “aren’t cool,” and after a while of saying these things, these words we spoke, or thought, or wrote about ourselves feel so real, that they take on a life of their own and become a part of our reality. That is why we need to reteach ourselves to think before we speak. That is why we need to start building ourselves up with good words. A quote that I really like from the movie Tintin, said by Capitan Haddock is, “There are plenty of others willing to call you a failure. A fool. A loser. A hopeless souse. Don’t you ever say it of yourself.” This is something that I tell people all the time. Capitan Haddock is right, there are tons of people who will say bad things about you, but you should never say it about yourself, because once you do, you’re agreeing with them. Agreeing with them is considered admitting to defeat in the eyes of the Capitan. Capitan Haddock wants us to know that we should never give up without a fight. That is why I decided that I would start up a little challenge for myself, and for everyone reading this blog.

            Here’s how it is going to work: make a list of good words that you can put towards yourself. For example, you could write down the word creative. The list should have at least ten to twenty things on it. Once you have made your list write the words I AM big and bold on the top, and post your list up somewhere where you can see it often. Every time you walk by the list, read it. Look at all the good words, the words that are true to you. If you want, make lists of good words for your friends, family, pets, co-workers, etc.

If you want an example of words that you can use, here are a few:

  1. Funny
  2. Smart
  3. Attractive
  4. Creative
  5. Great
  6. Loyal
  7. Brave
  8. Strong
  9. Talented
  10. Kind-hearted
  11. Friendly
  12. Patient
  13. Sweet
  14. Happy
  15. Healthy
  16. Good-looking
  17. Cute
  18. Wonderful
  19. Excellent
  20. Fabulous
  21. Tranquil

 

Till next time,

 

Orion.

My First Limerick

Tonight, I decided that before I went to bed I’d try and write a limerick. I’ve never written one before…actually I’m not sure how but I thought, “Eh, why not?” And so began my re-education, on what in fact a limerick was, and how it worked. Before I began, all I remembered about limericks, from Ninth Grade English, was that they were a form of poetry that followed a specific rhythm. However, I didn’t remember what the rhythm was, or how it worked, and everything else I knew about limericks…was basically nothing at all. “This is going to be…um fun?” Was what popped into my head as I looked at the webpage holding the information I required. The title fit perfectly, “How to Write a Limerick.” From what I had learned thus far, a limerick consists of five lines, and those five lines followed the pattern AABBA. For a brief moment I said the pattern to myself, naming each line on my finger. Basically, the A lines, which are lines one, two and five, all rhyme, and the B lines, lines three and four, rhyme. Once this was drilled into my brain, I read on. What I learned next was that the A lines, and B lines had specific rhythms that they followed. “So many patterns.” I thought while again drilling them into my head. “Da Dum Da Da Dum Da Da Dum,” was the rhythm for the A lines, and the rhythm for the B lines were, “Da Dum Da Da Dum.” It seemed pretty basic, once I started clapping it as I said it, as I am a very right brained person. As instructed by the webpage, I was to pick a one syllable name. I decided to use the name Jane, then followed the example they were giving me.

There once was a girl named Jane.

Next I was instructed to come up with words that rhymed with the name I had chosen. “Lane, bane, insane, main, cane, rain, slain, Ukraine, humane, obtain, terrain…” I decided to rhyme Jane with Lane.

That lived on Rosemary Lane.

After that, I was on the B lines, where the story would take place. I decided that I would have Jane sing.

Miss Jane loved to sing,

Such sweet little things.

And her voice was far from plain.

Once I was finished, I looked at my work with a sense of joy. I had written a limerick. It felt good to know, that I had tried something new. In the end, I was glad that I had found that webpage that had originally given me the idea. If you’d like to write a limerick yourself, here’s the link http://poetreecreations.org/how-to-write-a-limerick/

Now, here is the finished product of my first limerick:

There once was a girl named Jane,

That lived on Rosemary Lane.

Miss Jane loved to sing,

Such sweet little things.

And her voice was far from plain.

 Special thanks to poetreecreations.org.

 

Goodnight,

 

Orion.