Why I Watch Kids Movies During Exam Time

Watching movies may not sound like the most productive thing you could do while you have several exams to prepare for. You’ve got to review everything you know about Tap Water before you can even think about going anywhere more than 2 seconds from your room.

Sleeping, eating, drinking, social interaction; these things that we need in order to survive no longer matter.

The only thing we care about is passing so that we can move on with our lives and never have to think about the complexity that is Tap Water again.

So why on earth would I watch movies during a time where my main focus should be on learning everything I need to know for the exam? The answer, though it may not seem like it, is very simple. Watching movies, specifically kids movies allows me to relieve stress. After being awake between 8am and 3am for almost two weeks, with one meal a day and little to no social interaction outside of the classroom, I decided while in my zombie-like state that I wanted to watch something…specifically something that would make me laugh, and so I began watching shows.

When I reacted the final of each of the shows I was watching/catching up on, I realized that the shows were themselves stressful to watch as some of the episodes would leave me near tears due to some of the subject matter.

Then I decided, “I will watch a movie I haven’t seen in years!” and started searching up all of these kids movies that I hadn’t seen since I was maybe…well whenever I last saw them. A lot of the movies that I like came out around the time I was born, which makes sense now because my mother would say that I looked like a character from one of those films when I was maybe 5 or 6?

Ever since I began watching these happily ever after, funny, annoyingly corny movies, I’ve been in good spirits about writing my exams and I also ended up forgetting how incredibly tired I was…or am. I’m still tired but I’m about to watch An American Tail 2. I’ve never seen this one, and my little sister and I used to sing that one song that Fievel and his sister Tanya sing when my sister got this doll, and it was the only doll of that kind that she owned…so we pretended her doll was waiting for her family to come to our imaginary toy land. Our stuffed monkey Zoboomafoo (r.i.p D’:), was like her caretaker and he’d carry her around the town and stuff…this is becoming a totally random slightly off topic thing. Anyways it was a great song and the movie was pretty cute. Plus I like history…so I know I’ll learn something from it. I’m Canadian so I’d rather watch A Canadian Tail but that doesn’t exist…and well, Canadian television is finally stepping up its game. I think it will be a while until we have another good film. Our documentaries are pretty great though. Yah…I seriously should just write for television so we’ll gain more popularity. I have so many scripts that my sister and I have made over the years and our friends really liked them. However I’m more of a novelist…who likes to use a pen name because I’m kind of shy and my mom recommended it even though she doesn’t know anything about writing…or really care about it all that much.

Okay my eyes are literally burning…and now they’re watering. I think I should watch my movie and go to bed right after.

I may be less active for a few days I may not…depends on how confident I am after tomorrow.

Good luck to those with exams…and just some friendly advice….don’t stay up until 3 am everyday with only one meal in your belly. It is painful…and you will end up eating very unhealthy in order to pretend you aren’t starving.

Oh and don’t tell yourself you’re fasting because like…you’re not, you’re just choosing not to eat because eating requires leaving your studies and you know that if you walk away you are not coming back until like the day before the exam okay?

My dad was right I do say like a lot.

I have a stomach ache.

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Goodbyes: The End of Both Writer’s Club, and High School

Over the last year, I have grown a lot as a writer. I’ve broken out of my shell and joined groups where I can spend time with other writers, doing exercises, editing, and learning about new competitions. The experience has be great, and it has helped me meet so many extraordinary people. It even helped me build a strong relationship with some of my teachers, whom of which now I trust quite a lot, and will greatly miss when I leave this small school of mine.

This week, we heard that the club would be dwindling down, as the year is coming to an end. Exams are, unfortunately much closer than we want to believe.

It’s still hard to believe that four years of my life have just zipped by. It’s as if I’d been sitting on a train in the subway waiting for my next stop. I knew it was coming, however it happened all so suddenly. Thankfully, unlike a subway train, the memories I made are not a blurred image in a window. These memories are so clear, it is as if they happened yesterday.

If only there were some way to say, “Goodbye,” without it meaning farewell.

Though I am ready to begin the next chapter in my life, saying goodbye will still feel odd. It’s as if somewhere inside of me, I think that after I walk out those doors and get on the bus for the final time, that I’ll be back again the next day….I loved my time as this little school. I have no regrets. I wouldn’t do a thing different. High school was absolutely perfect, and the memories I made during these last four years, will always be remembered in my heart as something worth cherishing.Image

I do hope that in university there will be some sort of group for writers, where I can go and meet those who have similar interests as me. I hope that I made an excellent, strong group of friends like the ones I will be finishing with. I will do my best not to crawl back into my shell, and let my presence be known. In order for these wishes of mine to become a reality, I must take small baby steps and make the first move.

While I am away, I will try and start up a list of advice to give to my younger sister, as she will need it quite soon after. It will be strange not having her storm around the house while getting ready in the morning (she isn’t a morning person). Well, I’m sure that I will get used to the changes eventually.

Till next time,

 

Orion.

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It’s Just a Name: Is the Name That I Give to My Character Actually Important?

names

It’s one thing to slap a label onto a character, it’s another to give it a name.

Not everyone takes this into consideration when creating their own characters, however what they don’t seem to realize is that names are symbolic and often reflect ones personality. This means that the name you give to your character should have some sort of significance.

A great example of a well named character, is the character Daisy from the novel, The Great Gatsby. Being named after a flower adds to her extremely, dainty and feminine persona. The flower itself, also symbolize unhappy love, which is significant to the character Daisy because her marriage is an unhappy one, full of careless lies.

“I read in a book once that a rose by any other name would smell as sweet, but I’ve never been able to believe it. I don’t believe a rose WOULD be as nice if it was called a thistle or a skunk cabbage.”
L.M. Montgomery, Anne of Green Gables.

If Daisy had been given a name like Rogue, meaning rebel, her personality would not be reflected in the same way. This is because the name Rogue gives the impression of someone, strong, and daring. The name also would not be a reflection of Daisy’s unhappy marriage.

Putting thought into a character’s name builds onto the characters personality, acts as a form of symbolism, and a character’s name can also have significance to their overall story.

So to answer the question above?

Yes, the name you give to your character is actually important.

Tip: Look up the meaning of a name before giving it to a character. This can help you pick a name that suits your characters personality and it also helps save your lovely’s (characters) from getting slapped with labels.

This Week on Orion Writer: Characters

“I read in a book once that a rose by any other name would smell as sweet, but I’ve never been able to believe it. I don’t believe a rose WOULD be as nice if it was called a thistle or a skunk cabbage.”
L.M. Montgomery, Anne of Green Gables.

“Its one thing to simply slap a label onto a character, it is another to give it a name.”

Orion Ryder.

This week on my blog, I will be sharing tips on how to create and give life to your characters. Make sure to check daily for tips, advice and more on things such as:

  •  Naming characters.
  • Giving characters personality.
  • Knowing whether or not a character needs to be remodelled or cut.
  • Making the character easy for readers to relate to.

Writing Tip: Al…

Writing Tip: Always save your work. Even if you think it has a weak plot, or that it is poorly written, you can always come back and pick away at it. Plus, it’s cool to see how much you’ve improved over time. Keeping old works allows you to pick out what you liked and didn’t like about your previous writing.

Tips from Orion

 

I made this...how artistic of me.

I made this…how artistic of me.

Ever since I entered into my late teens, many things have happened in my life where I’ve needed help but was too afraid to ask. This week, for instance, two events occurred that I didn’t know how to handle on my own. So what did I do? Well, I tried to keep my struggling from those who love and care for me the most. With the first event, I practically let everything crumble before me, and in the end, after all the anger, my dad came up to my room to have a “chat” with me.
“If you can’t even come to us for help, then who are you supposed to turn to?” He asked.
I never gave him an answer. I didn’t have one. I usually locked away my frustration, pushed my hardships aside, and at all costs avoided stressful situations. Though it made me feel like a coward at times, I was afraid that if I ever asked for help, someone would judge me. However, the other day I forced myself to knock down my walls and ask my friends and family for some advice. Still, I never asked my parents, but I did turn to a trusted adult, who understood me well enough, and who I felt wouldn’t judge or criticize me about the thoughts that were racing through my mind.
As time has flown by, these last four years, I’ve learned that high school is full of its ups and downs. I found that even though you learn a lot about others, you learn the a lot more about yourself. One of the most important things that I’ve learned is that it is better to seek help when you need it, rather than keeping everything locked inside, especially while in school. If something is bothering you there is no shame in telling someone, whether it’s a parent, a friend, or a trusted adult. I know it’s hard to admit that you still need guidance when you’re around my age. Sometimes us teens feel that it is better try to appear older, and stronger than we actually are, but we’re still kids, and honestly everyone, no matter how big or small needs a lending hand once in a while.
After asking for help from my friends and family, this was the advice I was given:
1. If you don’t have a peace about it, walk away.
2. Do whatever you think is right. In the end it’s up to you.
3. Be honest.

Anyways, I just thought I’d share something a little more personal.
Till next time,

Orion.

Using Multiple First Person P.O.V’s

Books that have more than one first person P.O.V (point of view) are a bit uncommon, especially when it comes to Young Adult fiction genres. The reasoning for this is because a lot of authors find it difficult to write for more than one leading character using a first person narrator. If you have ever thought of writing a book that uses more than one first person P.O.V here are some tips that might help you to get started.

            BONUS: writing exercise at the bottom.

  1. Don’t use too many characters to tell the story:  Too many characters are too hard to follow, not only for the reader but for the writer. Sometimes it can make the story more complicated than it needs to be. The highest amount of characters when writing in first person P.O.V should be four. Going over four characters can make the reader either lose interest or make the story challenging to understand.
  2. Make sure each character has purpose: To do this try asking yourself questions like: what makes this character important? Are they helping the flow of the story?
  3. Don’t change characters within a chapter: This is something that really bothered me when I was younger…actually it still bugs me today. Changing characters within a chapter is extremely irritating for readers. This is because they aren’t able to automatically indicate which character is speaking. This causes a lot of confusion for the reader, and sometimes will cause them to lose interest in the story itself.
  4. Each character should have a distinct voice: To help tell characters apart in each chapter, give them their own specific characteristics, especially in their speech. Make sure that they appear different to the reader.

 

Writing Exercise: Everyone reacts differently, even in the same situation. For this exercise we will be using two characters: a young girl (friend or sister), and a middle aged man (father or teacher). The story should be at least two pages long (typed 2 pages, written one page front and back). Here is the situation: A seven year old boy, named Julian, is hospitalized after being hit by a car on his way home from school.

After you are done writing the reaction for both characters look and see that your stories have the following:

  1. The two character have a distinctly different voice.
  2. The characters reactions are different.
  3. The characters personality suits their age.
  4. The language used in the text fit the age of the character.
  5. The story is an appropriate length.
  6. There is an atmosphere and tone.

If you would like to share your pieces (one or both), feel free to leave a link in the comment section below. Also, don’t be afraid to share your own tips on writing for multiple first person P.O.V’s.

I hope that this blog was helpful, and got you doing a little bit of writing. Before I conclude, I’ve got a question for you. Which point of you do you prefer to write in: First person, second person, or third person? Why?

 

Till next time,

 

Orion.

 

 

 

 

Tips for Writing Books for Kids

  1. Find your inner child: to write for kids, you need to become a kid.
  2. Take risks: If you want to write the word fart, WRITE IT!
  3. Talk to kids: Seriously, you can have some pretty great conversations with a 4 year old about why they don’t like hotdogs.
  4. Read kids books: Find that old Curious George and read Monkey, READ!
  5. Ask people about their kids: Sometimes people’s kids do some pretty whacky stuff.
  6. Think about what you did as a kid: Did you cut off your sisters doll heads? Did you think if you poured milk in the garden the tomatoes would turn white?
  7. Be CREATIVE! Do I really need to explain this? PURPLE!
  8. Be real: seriously write from your heart okay? You and the pencil…or keyboard or whatever…ARE ONE!

I’ll be giving tips often. If there’s anything specific you want to ask me about, feel free to comment. There are no bad/dumb questions. There are only bad/dumb answers.